ucresearch:

akiracomplexsound:

UC Berkeley scientists have developed a system to capture visual activity in human brains and reconstruct it as digital video clips. Eventually, this process will allow you to record and reconstruct your own dreams on a computer screen.

more here

"This is a major leap toward reconstructing internal imagery. We are opening a window into the movies in our minds."

—  Jack Gallant, UC Berkeley neuroscientist

(Source: oh-whiskers, via neuroticthought)

samjoonyuh:

zoo-logic:


Today is Earth Overshoot Day.In less than nine months, we have now used more natural resources than what it takes the planet 12 months to produce. For the remainder of 2013, we will be living on resources borrowed from future generations.
This year Earth Overshoot Day—the approximate date human resource demands exceed nature’s budget—fell on August 20. Two days earlier than last year. In fact, since 2001, Overshoot Day has moved ahead by an average of 3 days per year.
And by 2050, the global population is expected to reach 9 billion—only increasing pressure on Earth’s natural resources. On this finite planet, we need to change the way we think about everything, but especially about where and how we live, work and travel, along with what and how much we consume.
Overshoot Day is a bold indication that now is the time to make a change. Small actions can make a big difference. We each play an important role in creating a world where we all live within our ecological limits.

    WWF    Image by DonkeyHotey

Plus the Pacific Ocean is radioactive now sooooo

samjoonyuh:

zoo-logic:

Today is Earth Overshoot Day.

In less than nine months, we have now used more natural resources than what it takes the planet 12 months to produce. For the remainder of 2013, we will be living on resources borrowed from future generations.

This year Earth Overshoot Day—the approximate date human resource demands exceed nature’s budget—fell on August 20. Two days earlier than last year. In fact, since 2001, Overshoot Day has moved ahead by an average of 3 days per year.

And by 2050, the global population is expected to reach 9 billion—only increasing pressure on Earth’s natural resources. On this finite planet, we need to change the way we think about everything, but especially about where and how we live, work and travel, along with what and how much we consume.

Overshoot Day is a bold indication that now is the time to make a change. Small actions can make a big difference. We each play an important role in creating a world where we all live within our ecological limits.

    WWF
    
Image by DonkeyHotey

Plus the Pacific Ocean is radioactive now sooooo

(via thirtyfeetofstone)

nevver:

Make a wish.

neuromorphogenesis:

Yale team finds nicotinic receptor essential for cognition — and mental health

(via neuroticthought)

Lady drummer. Me.

Lady drummer. Me.

fuckyeahneuroscience:

Our inner speech turns out to shape our thoughts and decisions in more ways than you might have imagined

IT CAN happen anywhere. I can be driving, walking by the river or sitting quietly in front of a blank screen. Sometimes suddenly, sometimes gradually and imperceptibly, I become conscious of words that no one else can hear, telling me things, guiding me, evaluating my actions. I am doing something perfectly ordinary – I am thinking– and it takes the form of a voice in my head.

If you ask people to reflect on their own stream of consciousness, they often describe experiences like this. Usually termed inner speech, it is also referred to as the inner voice, internal monologue or dialogue, or verbal thought. But although philosophers have long been interested in the relationship between language and thought, many believed that inner speech lay outside the realms of science. That is now changing, with new experimental designs for encouraging it, interfering with it and neuroimaging it. We are beginning to understand how the experience is created in the brain; its subjective qualities – essentially, what the words “sound” like; and its role in processes such as self-control and self-awareness. The voice in our head is finally revealing its secrets, and it is just as powerful as you might have imagined.

Much of modern research has been inspired by the long-neglected theories of L. S. Vygotsky, a Russian psychologist whose career unfolded in the early days of the Soviet Union. Vygotsky only studied psychology for about 10 years before his untimely death from tuberculosis in his late thirties – a fact that has led some to call him “the Mozart of psychology”. Starting with observations of children talking to themselves while playing, Vygotsky hypothesised that this “private speech” develops out of social dialogue with parents and caregivers. Over time, these private mutterings become further internalised to form inner speech.

If Vygotsky was right, inner speech should have some very special properties. Because it develops from social interactions, it should take on some of the qualities of a dialogue, an exchange between different points of view. Vygotsky also proposed that inner speech undergoes some important transformations as it becomes internalised, such as becoming abbreviated or condensed relative to external speech. For instance, when hearing a loud metallic sound outside at night and realising that the cat is to blame, you probably wouldn’t say to yourself, “The cat has knocked the dustbin over.” Instead, you might just say, “The cat,” since that utterance contains all the information you need to express to yourself.

Partly because Vygotsky’s work was suppressed by the Soviet authorities, it was a long time before his ideas became well known in the West, and even longer before researchers tested whether people actually report these qualities in their inner speech. In the first such study, conducted in 2011 at Durham University, UK, my colleague Simon McCarthy-Jones and I found that 60 per cent of people report that their inner speech has the to-and-fro quality of a conversation.

Note: you need a New Scientist account to read this one but it’s free to sign up. Also, the article is for a limited time only.

"An entire sea of water can’t sink a ship unless it gets inside the ship. Similarly, the negativity of the world can’t put you down unless you allow it to get inside you."

— Goi Nasu (via cosmofilius)

(Source: the-healing-nest, via jessicaclark-deactivated2013113)

scorpi0n:

Portrait of a Childproof Man by Michael Cina on Flickr.

odinsblog:

Rachel Maddow breaks it down so simply that an 8th grader could understand it:

  1. ExxonMobil is more profitable than Walmart, Google, McDonald’s, American Express and Goldman Sachs combined
  2. Exxon’s fine for the oil Pegasus Pipeline spill in Arkansas is only a tiny fraction of its daily profit
  3. Again, Exxon paid just a tiny fraction of its daily profit for the entire Yellowstone oil spill


This begs (at least) three questions: Why does the U.S. Government even subsidize oil companies in the first place? Why doesn’t our government have more serious fines for oil spills? AND ARE WE SERIOUSLY CONSIDERING THE KEYSTONE PIPELINE?!? REALLY? NO, REALLY? 

The Keystone Pipeline will absolutely, positively spring a leak already has sprung several leaks

The oil industry has no clue how to clean up or prevent the leaks and they aren’t even exploring new technologies for oil spill clean ups

The KXL Pipeline will go through a MAJOR clean water drinking aquifer. Is America so stupid to “drill baby drill” that we’re willing to endanger our most valuable non-renewable resource —water— for a finite fossil fuel that wind and solar tech will ultimately replace?

(via thirtyfeetofstone)